Eastbridge Resident Requesting Forest City Build Restaurant IN His House

restaurant in houseEastbridge residents had anxiously awaited the town center they were promised over 10 years ago. People wanted a grocery store and restaurants they could easily walk to, instead of having to drive or ride bikes the roughly two miles to the 29th Street town center. Then, last year, the Stanley opened up with great restaurants, shops, and places to enjoy booze and socialize. The Stanley is right across 26th Avenue into Aurora, and is very easy to get to. Area residents immediately fell in love with the project. “We love going to the Stanley and deciding what we want when we get there,” said resident Wendi Hayne. “Plus, it’s so convenient to get to, especially when you have little ones.” The Stanley project quieted a lot of voices who had been complaining about wanting a town center. “It was so close,” said resident Eric Lembeck. “At that point, when the Stanley had opened, I honestly didn’t care that much if the town center opened or not. We had something that was filling our needs quite nicely.”

Then, the Eastbridge Town Center opened giving area residents an even closer option. “It’s not like we will stop going to Stanley,” exclaimed Brian Kleese. “But the town center also has great eating options, and it is nice having the grocery store so close. It takes me less than five minutes to get to that place. It’s pretty darn convenient.” Marla Johnson agrees. “The Eastbridge town center is just so easy to get to,” said Johnson. “Obviously, crossing MLK is tough, but other than that, I mean, it’s right here.”

For most all of the Eastbridge residents, having the Stanley and Eastbridge town center satisfies their needs. But at least one man is hoping things get just a little more convenient. “I love Stanley and the town center,” said Andy Dellert. “They are great. And maybe I’m getting a little spoiled, but I just think I could have something even closer.” In fact, Dellert has petitioned Forest City to build a restaurant inside his home. “I figure it will be easy to get to, you know, being right in my house and all,” said Dellert. “I will have to go down steps, probably, depending on the final design, but it’s better than biking or walking all the way to Stanley (.75 miles) or the town center (.5 miles).” Forest City is taking the request seriously and is looking into the potential of putting a restaurant in the Dellert home. “If there is money to be had, we will obviously consider it,” said Forest City spokesperson Janelle Ayers. “Now, if he was asking us to put in income-qualified housing, well, that’s clearly something we won’t consider.” Dellert says he isn’t even concerned with the type of restaurant at this point. “Surprise me. I mean, I’m pretty easy going, so have some fun with it.” Forest City says a final decision will be made on putting a dining establishment in the Dellert home by the end of September. “Fingers crossed,” said Dellert. “Hope to get another great option even closer by.”

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Stapleton Parent Confesses, “Time Isn’t Going by Fast Enough”

first day of schoolThe first day of school is the common time parents realize how quickly their children are growing up. As parents, we have known our children since birth, and can easily recall every year of their lives. So, when people realize their child is now a fifth grader but without difficulty can remember that same child struggling to learn how to walk, time seems to be going by very quickly. “I really can’t believe our little man is already in 3rd grade,” said area mom Amanda Shannon. “I mean, our little guy is such a big boy now,” she continued as she fought to hold back tears. Jim McDonald also feels his kids are growing up too fast. “Both my kids are now in full time school,” said McDonald. “I can’t believe it. Where does the time go? I love them where they are at now, but boy, time really goes by too quickly. Things need to slow down.” These are the sentiments universally shared by nearly all parents. We did find one area man who disagreed, however.
Continue reading “Stapleton Parent Confesses, “Time Isn’t Going by Fast Enough””

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Leaving Stapleton for First Time in Months, Resident Experiences Sh#ttiness of Denver Traffic

bad denver trafficIf you live in Stapleton, for many reasons, you may choose to not leave the hood or even have to leave Stapleton that often. With The Stanley and Eastbridge town center, there are plenty of good restaurants, so you don’t have to leave for food and drink. Most of the neighborhood kids attend one of the many great Stapleton schools and have their activities in the area. Stapleton even has an inordinate number of people who work remotely, so they don’t have to drive into an office. And finally, with the train, if you need to go downtown or the airport, you can park and ride anywhere along the A-Line to get where you need to go without having to be in a car for more than five minutes. Stapleton residents are very lucky to not have to be out in their cars driving around outside of Stapleton that much. The Denver population continues to grow, and so does the number of vehicles on the road. Stapleton resident Bradley Meehan realized this all too well on his recent trip outside of Stapleton.

“I had to pick something up in the highlands and was on I-70,” said Meehan. “I couldn’t believe how packed the roads were. It was two in the afternoon. It wasn’t like morning or afternoon rush hour, this was two. It was ridiculous.” Luckily, Bradley says he rarely needs to leave Stapleton by car. “If I do go in a car, it’s usually by Uber and usually later in the evening, so traffic is a little better. But apparently, if you are going anywhere in Denver between 6AM and 7PM, you’re pretty much screwed. I never remember it being this bad.” Meehan recommends to other Stapleton residents they should just stay put, unless they absolutely have to be in their car outside of Stapleton. “Moving forward, I refuse to drive between those peak hours, or what essentially is half the day. I’ll train if I have to, or even ride a bike. Hell, I really don’t have that many reasons to leave Stapleton anymore. But, every once in a while, I treat myself to a train ride to the city. Traffic is just way to sh#tty for me to deal with.”

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Stapleton Man Prepared to Strangle Next Person Asking, “How Was Your Summer?”

Society, or at least American society, has a series of social norms. One of these norms is politely asking questions of people of which you clearly don’t care or want to hear the answer to. Some of these include, “how are you,” “what have you been up to,” “how is your family,” “any big plans for (whatever season),” and “how’s your job going,” among tens of others. People ask these questions when they have nothing original to offer in conversation, yet feel awkwardly compelled to speak to someone. Sure, sometimes these questions can be genuine, but a lot of times, if you really cared about the person you were talking to, you would already know the answer to these general questions. In the end, the person asking the questions is trying to make an effort to be polite, so they shouldn’t be criticized for their efforts.

Stapleton resident Chad Caughron feels differently however, especially in regards to a particular question. “Summer is now over, and you run into lots of people you haven’t seen for a while,” said a frustrated Caughron. “People at grocery stores, out to eat, and especially now at school. People keep asking me, ‘how was your summer?’ They really want me to sum up a three month time period in a paragraph or less? It’s one thing when people ask how you are doing today, but how has my last 90 days been? That’s a pretty ridiculous question.” Caughron would prefer people either not ask, or be more specific when speaking about large time periods. “If the question was, ‘what was the best place you went to this summer?’ or ‘are you excited to get the kids back in school?’ I can handle those. Quick and easy. But don’t make me condense my entire summer down to a few words and pretend I think you care.” Coughron has become so annoyed by the question, there’s a chance he could get violent if someone asks him again. “I swear, I’m going to strangle someone if I hear it again,” said Coughron. “I’m just going to jump at them screaming, and grab their neck. There better be some people around ready to pull me off. I just can’t handle it any more.” Maybe we should all be careful about asking people about their summers. There could be more Chad Caughron’s out there.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Stapleton Friends Overheard Arguing Who Had Busier European Vacation

busy european vacationFor better or worse, Stapleton is a community of privilege. The issues Stapleton residents deal with, are typically “white people problems” or at the very least “first world problems.” Stapleton residents may be heard discussing having one of their luxury SUV’s in the shop, or that a dance class they wanted their child to get into filled up, and even issues with their place in the mountains. But, nothing was more Stapleton than what resident Jennifer Larson overheard while at the Stanley two weeks ago. “I was sitting out in one of the common areas doing some work and drinking coffee,” said Larson. These two ladies, who must have been friends, were sitting there talking and laughing, but they were also kind of arguing. It was really ridiculous.”

Larson pointed out two things that were obnoxious about the conversation. “First of all, they were talking extremely loud,” said Larson. “Secondly, they were actually arguing over who they thought had a busier European vacation. I mean, that’s pretty pretentious, even for Stapleton.” Larson said it got to the point where the friends were mapping out the schedule they had and comparing photos to see who ran around more. “It was really incredible. They would say things like, ‘Oh, you didn’t make it there? We did.’ I guess if you are going to argue over your fancy Euro-trip, maybe do so more quietly or somewhere private.”

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Mom Admits When Kids Are Tired, “They’re Pretty F#ckng Miserable”

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

Stapleton mom Michelle Graunke adores her children. She spends as much time with them as she can and will do everything for them. “They are just so sweet,” said Graunke. “They are the greatest thing and really terrific kids.” Graunke says overall, her kids behave extremely well. “We never get complaints from teachers or coaches, or their friend’s parents. It’s really nice knowing when we send them places, they’re going to be good.” There are occasions where the kids aren’t a picture of perfection, however. “When the kids are tired, it’s a total f#cking nightmare,” said Graunke. “I mean, I love those little bastards to death, but when they’re tired…they test me.” Graunke says bedtime can be a real mess. “I mean, if we’re getting them to bed just a minute passed the tipping point, it gets a little nuts. Screaming, crying, and sometimes, physical violence. They’re pretty f#cking miserable.” Graunke says she always comes back to loving them, but she goes through a short window of wondering what the hell she was thinking when she decided she wanted to have kids. “After they are sleeping, I calm down, remember the good times, and I am back to worshiping them again. But, man, during that tired-fit phase, I just want to just kill those little f#ckers.”

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Next Door Alert: No One Gives a Sh#t About Your God Damn Cat

cat articleThe popular social media site Next Door is often used by Northeast Denver residents. The site allows people to buy and sell items, post events, and even has a lost and found. The most common use is alerting others to suspicious behavior or crime in the neighborhood to help others become aware of important information. If something is time sensitive, people can mark their posts “urgent.” If there is an accident, a serious crime situation, a missing dog, and sometimes even a missing child, people often mark these posts “urgent” so that the messages get delivered directly to people’s email boxes. The aforementioned situations absolutely qualify as urgent, and area residents should give these matters the appropriate amount of attention.

There are some situations where Next Door members are too liberal with the term “urgent” posting an item as urgent when the situation did not dictate it. The most common involves a missing feline. “I hate getting urgent emails from Next Door only to find out someone’s old cat is missing,” said Next Door user Skylar Walsworth. “It’s extremely annoying. I’m expecting to see big news on a crime in progress, but it’s just that someone let their senile house cat slip out. Sorry, can’t help you.” Stapleton resident and Next Door user Kate Hanson feels the same way. “It’s a cat,” exclaimed Hanson. “And no, a missing cat and a missing dog are not the same thing. First off, they’re from totally different suborders. Secondly, you can easily tell dogs apart. And finally, people like dogs.” Next Door user Eric Miller has a possible solution to the “urgent” missing cat issue. “Why not add it as a user group,” suggests miller. “You could choose if you want to hear about missing cats, or any animals really. If you care about cats, you will get all of the “urgent” missing cat notices. If you don’t care for them, you won’t be burdened with the emails.” However, the rule of thumb for users should be they understand no one gives a sh#t about god damn cats.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS